You are here

Germany violates the prohibition of torture and police brutality

Info in Enlish and French:
Zeitungen und Presse: Europäischer Gerichtshof für Menschenrechte - Deutschland hat gegen das Folterverbot verstoßen
http://thevoiceforum.org/node/397

Press release – 421(2006)
11.07.2006

EUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTS

Press release issued by the Registrar

GRAND CHAMBER JUDGMENT
JALLOH v. GERMANY

The European Court of Human Rights has today delivered at a public hearing its Grand Chamber judgment1 in the case of Jalloh v. Germany (application no. 54810/00).

The Court held by:

• ten votes to seven, that there had been a violation of Article 3 (prohibition of inhuman and degrading treatment) of the European Convention on Human Rights as a result of the administration of an emetic to make the applicant regurgitate a tiny plastic bag of cocaine he had swallowed;
• eleven votes to six, that there had been a violation of Article 6 § 1 (right to a fair trial) of the Convention as a result of the applicant’s conviction on the basis of evidence that had been obtained in violation of the Convention.

Under Article 41 (just satisfaction) of the Convention, the Court awarded the applicant 10,000 euros (EUR) in respect of non-pecuniary damage and EUR 5,868.88 for costs and expenses. (The judgment is available in English and French.)

1. Principal facts

The case concerns an application brought by Abu Bakah Jalloh, a national of Sierra Leone, who was born in 1965 and lives in Cologne (Germany).

On 29 October 1993, plain-clothes policemen spotted the applicant taking two tiny plastic bags out of his mouth and handing them over for money. Considering that the bags contained drugs, the police officers went over to arrest the applicant.

While they were doing so he swallowed another tiny bag he still had in his mouth. As no drugs were found on him, the competent public prosecutor ordered that he be given an emetic (Brechmittel) to force him to regurgitate the bag.

The applicant was taken to a hospital in Wuppertal-Elberfeld, where he saw a doctor. As he refused to take medication to induce vomiting, four police officers held him down while a doctor inserted a tube through his nose and administered a salt solution and Ipecacuanha syrup by force. The doctor also injected him with apomorphine, a morphine derivative. As a result the applicant regurgitated a small bag containing 0.2182 g of cocaine. A short while later he was examined by a doctor who declared him fit for detention. About two hours after being given the emetics, the applicant, who was found not to speak German, said in broken English that he was too tired to make a statement about the alleged offence.
./..
On 30 October 1993 the applicant was charged with drug-trafficking and placed in detention on remand. His lawyer advanced three main arguments in his defence: firstly, the evidence against him had been obtained illegally and so could not be used in the criminal proceedings; secondly, the police officers and the doctor who had participated in the operation were guilty of causing bodily harm in the exercise of official duties (Körperverletzung im Amt); thirdly, the administration of toxic substances was prohibited by Section 136a of the Code of Criminal Procedure (Strafprozeßordnung) and the measure was also disproportionate under Section 81a of the Code, as it would have been possible to obtain the same result by waiting until the bag had been excreted naturally.

On 23 March 1994 the Wuppertal District Court convicted the applicant of drug-trafficking and gave him a one-year suspended prison sentence.

His appeal against conviction was unsuccessful, although his prison sentence was reduced to six-months, suspended. A further appeal was dismissed.

The Federal Constitutional Court declared the applicant’s constitutional complaint inadmissible, finding that he had not made use of all available remedies before the German criminal courts. It also found that the measure in question did not give rise to any constitutional objections concerning the protection of human dignity or prevention of self-incrimination, as guaranteed under the German Basic Law.

2. Procedure and composition of the Court

The application was lodged with the European Court of Human Rights on 30 January 2000 and declared partly admissible on 26 October 2004.

On 1 February 2005 the Chamber to which the case had been allocated relinquished jurisdiction in favour of the Grand Chamber under Article 302 of the Convention. A Grand Chamber hearing took place in the Human Rights building, Strasbourg on 23 November 2005.

Judgment was given by a Grand Chamber of 17 judges composed as follows:

Luzius Wildhaber (Swiss), President,
Christos Rozakis (Greek),
Nicolas Bratza (British),
Boštjan M. Zupančič (Slovenian),
Georg Ress (German),
Giovanni Bonello (Maltese),
Lucius Caflisch (Swiss)3
Ireneu Cabral Barreto (Portuguese),
Matti Pellonpää (Finnish),
András Baka (Hungarian),
Rait Maruste (Estonian),
Snejana Botoucharova (Bulgarian),
Javier Borrego Borrego (Spanish),
Elisabet Fura-Sandström (Swedish),
Alvina Gyulumyan (Armenian),
Khanlar Hajiyev (Azerbaijani),
Ján Šikuta (Slovakian), judges,

and also Lawrence Early, Section Registrar.

3. Summary of the judgment4

Complaints

The applicant complained that he had been administered an emetic by force and that the evidence thereby obtained – in his view, illegally – had been used against him at his trial. He further complained that his right not to incriminate himself had been violated. He relied on Articles 3, 6 and 8 of the Convention.

Decision of the Court

Article 3

The Court reiterated that the Convention did not, in principle, prohibit recourse to a forcible medical intervention that would assist in the investigation of an offence. However, any interference with a person’s physical integrity carried out with the aim of obtaining evidence had to be the subject of rigorous scrutiny.

The Court was acutely aware of the problem confronting States in their efforts to combat the harm caused to their societies through the supply of drugs. However, in the case before it, it had been clear before the impugned measure was ordered and implemented that the street dealer on whom it was imposed had been storing the drugs in his mouth and could not, therefore, have been offering drugs for sale on a large scale. That had also been reflected in the sentence. The Court was not satisfied that the forcible administration of emetics had been indispensable to obtain the evidence. The prosecuting authorities could simply have waited for the drugs to pass out of the applicant’s system naturally, that being the method used by many other member States of the Council of Europe to investigate drugs offences.

The Court noted that neither the parties nor the experts could agree on whether the administration of emetics was dangerous. The Court was not satisfied that the method, which had already resulted in the deaths of two people in Germany, entailed merely negligible health risks. It noted that in the majority of the German Länder and in at least a large majority of the other member States of the Council of Europe the authorities refrained from forcibly administering emetics, a fact that tended to suggest that the measure was considered to pose health risks.

As to the manner in which the emetics were administered, the Court noted that, after using force verging on brutality, a tube was fed through the applicant’s nose into his stomach to overcome his physical and mental resistance. This must have caused him pain and anxiety. He was then subjected to a further bodily intrusion against his will through the injection of another emetic. The Court said that account also had to be taken of the applicant’s mental suffering while he waited for the emetics to take effect and of the fact that during that period he was restrained and kept under observation. Being forced to regurgitate under such conditions must have been humiliating for him, certainly far more so than waiting for the drugs to pass out of the body naturally.

As regards the medical supervision, the Court noted that the impugned measure was carried out by a doctor in a hospital. However, since the applicant had violently resisted the administration of the emetics and spoke no German and only broken English, the assumption had to be that he was either unable or unwilling to answer any questions that were put by the doctor or to submit to a prior medical examination.

As to the effects of the impugned measure on the applicant’s health, the Court found that it had not been established that either his treatment for stomach troubles in the prison hospital two and a half months after his arrest or any subsequent medical treatment he had received was caused by the forcible administration of the emetics.

In conclusion, the Court found that the German authorities had subjected the applicant to a grave interference with his physical and mental integrity against his will. They had forced him to regurgitate, not for therapeutic reasons, but in order to retrieve evidence they could equally have obtained by less intrusive methods. The manner in which the impugned measure was carried out had been liable to arouse in the applicant feelings of fear, anguish and inferiority that were capable of humiliating and debasing him. Furthermore, the procedure had entailed risks to the applicant’s health, not least because of the failure to obtain a proper anamnesis beforehand. Although this had not been the intention, the measure was implemented in a way which had caused the applicant both physical pain and mental suffering. He had therefore been subjected to inhuman and degrading treatment contrary to Article 3.

Article 8

The Court said that it had already examined the applicant’s complaint concerning the forcible administration of emetics to him under Article 3 of the Convention. In view of its conclusion that there had been a violation of that provision, it found that no separate issue arose under Article 8 of the Convention

Article 6

The Court noted that, even if it had not been the authorities’ intention to inflict pain and suffering on the applicant, the evidence was nevertheless obtained by a measure which breached one of the core rights guaranteed by the Convention. Furthermore, the drugs obtained by the impugned measure proved the decisive element in securing the applicant’s conviction. Lastly, the public interest in securing the applicant’s conviction could not justify allowing evidence obtained in that way to be used at the trial. Accordingly, the use in evidence of the drugs obtained by the forcible administration of emetics to the applicant had rendered his trial as a whole unfair.

Despite that finding, the Court considered it appropriate to address also the applicant’s argument that the manner in which the evidence had been obtained and the use that had been made of it had undermined his right not to incriminate himself.

As regards the nature and degree of compulsion that had been used to obtain the evidence, the Court reiterated that the administration of the emetics amounted to inhuman and degrading treatment. The public interest in securing the applicant’s conviction could not justify recourse to such a grave interference with his physical and mental integrity. Further, although German law afforded safeguards against arbitrary or improper use of the measure, the applicant, in reliance upon his right to remain silent, had refused to submit to a prior medical examination and had been subjected to the procedure without a full examination of his physical aptitude to withstand it. Lastly, the drugs thereby obtained were the decisive evidence in his conviction.

Consequently, the Court would also have been prepared to find that allowing the use at the applicant’s trial of evidence obtained by the forcible administration of emetics had infringed his right not to incriminate himself and therefore rendered his trial as a whole unfair.

Judges Bratza and Zupančič each expressed concurring opinions. Judges Wildhaber and Caflisch expressed a dissenting opinion. Judges Ress, Pellonpää, Baka and Sikuta expressed a joint dissenting opinion and Judge Hajiyev a dissenting opinion. The texts are annexed to the judgment.

The Court’s judgments are accessible on its Internet site (http://www.echr.coe.int).

Press Contacts
Emma Hellyer (telephone: 00 33 (0)3 90 21 42 15)
Stéphanie Klein (telephone: 00 33 (0)3 88 41 21 54)
Beverley Jacobs (telephone: 00 33 (0)3 90 21 54 21)

The European Court of Human Rights was set up in Strasbourg by the Council of Europe Member States in 1959 to deal with alleged violations of the 1950 European Convention on Human Rights.

Council of Europe Press Division
Tel: +33 (0)3 88 41 25 60
Fax:+33 (0)3 88 41 39 11
pressunit@coe.int
www.coe.int/press

1 Grand Chamber judgments are final (Article 44 of the Convention). 2 Where a case pending before a Chamber raises a serious question affecting the interpretation of the Convention or the protocols thereto, or where the resolution of a question before the Chamber might have a result inconsistent with a judgment previously delivered by the Court, the Chamber may, at any time before it has rendered its judgment, relinquish jurisdiction in favour of the Grand Chamber, unless one of the parties to the case objects. 3 Judge elected in respect of Liechtenstein. 4 This summary by the Registry does not bind the Court.

French

Communiqué de presse - 421(2006)
11.07.2006

COUR EUROPÉENNE DES DROITS DE L’HOMME

Communiqué du Greffier

ARRÊT DE GRANDE CHAMBRE
JALLOH c. ALLEMAGNE

La Cour européenne des Droits de l’Homme a prononcé aujourd’hui en audience publique son arrêt de Grande Chambre1 dans l’affaire Jalloh c. Allemagne (requête no 54810/00).

La Cour conclut, par :

• dix voix contre sept, à la violation de l’article 3 (interdiction des traitements inhumains ou dégradants) de la Convention européenne des Droits de l’Homme, du fait de l’administration au requérant d’un émétique afin de lui faire régurgiter un petit sachet de cocaïne ;

• onze voix contre six, à la violation de l’article 6 § 1 (droit à un procès équitable) du fait de la condamnation du requérant sur le fondement d’un élément de preuve recueilli en violation de la Convention.

En application de l’article 41 (satisfaction équitable) de la Convention, la Cour alloue au requérant 10 000 euros (EUR) pour dommage moral, ainsi que 5 868,88 EUR pour frais et dépens. (L’arrêt existe en français et en anglais.)

1. Principaux faits

Abu Bakah Jalloh est un ressortissant sierra-léonais né en 1965 et domicilié à Cologne (Allemagne).

Le 29 octobre 1993, des policiers en civil le virent retirer deux petits sachets de sa bouche et les échanger contre de l’argent. Soupçonnant que les sachets contenaient de la drogue, les policiers procédèrent à l’arrestation de l’intéressé.

Alors qu’ils étaient en train de l’appréhender, le requérant avala un autre petit sachet qu’il avait toujours dans sa bouche. Les policiers n’ayant pas trouvé de drogue sur lui, le procureur compétent ordonna qu’on lui administrât un émétique (Brechmittel) pour le forcer à régurgiter le sachet.

Le requérant fut emmené dans un hôpital de Wuppertal-Elberfeld où il fut présenté à un médecin. Comme l’intéressé refusa de prendre les médicaments nécessaires pour provoquer les vomissements, quatre policiers l’immobilisèrent pendant que le médecin lui fit passer un tube dans le nez et lui administra de force une solution salée et du sirop d’Ipecacuanha. Le médecin lui injecta également de l'apomorphine, substance dérivée de la morphine. Le requérant régurgita alors un petit sachet de 0,2182 grammes de cocaïne. Peu après, il fut examiné par un médecin qui le déclara apte à la détention. Environ deux heures après l’administration de l’émétique, le requérant indiqua à des policiers venus pour l’interroger, dans un mauvais anglais – on s’aperçut alors qu’il ne parlait pas l’allemand – qu’il était trop fatigué pour faire une déposition.

Le 30 octobre 1993, le requérant fut placé en détention provisoire et des poursuites pénales furent engagées contre lui pour trafic de stupéfiants. Son avocat articula sa défense autour de trois arguments principaux : premièrement, les preuves à charge avaient été obtenues de manière illégale et ne pouvaient donc être utilisées dans le cadre du procès ; deuxièmement, les policiers et le médecin qui avaient participé à l’opération s’étaient rendus coupables de coups et blessures dans l’exercice de leurs fonctions (Körperverletzung im Amt) ; troisièmement, l’administration de substances toxiques était prohibée par l’article 136 a) du code de procédure pénale (Strafprozeßordnung), et la mesure était également disproportionnée au sens de l’article 81 a) du même code, dès lors qu’il eût été possible de parvenir au même résultat en attendant l’excrétion naturelle du sachet.

Le 23 mars 1994, le tribunal de district de Wuppertal reconnut M. Jalloh coupable de trafic de stupéfiants et lui infligea une peine d’un an d’emprisonnement avec sursis.

Le requérant interjeta vainement appel de la décision, mais sa peine fut réduite à six mois d’emprisonnement avec sursis ; le pourvoi en cassation qu’il forma fut rejeté.

La Cour constitutionnelle fédérale déclara irrecevable la plainte constitutionnelle de l’intéressé, estimant que celui-ci n’avait pas épuisé les voies de recours disponibles devant les juridictions pénales allemandes. Elle jugea également que la mesure litigieuse ne justifiait pas la formulation d’objections constitutionnelles concernant la protection de la dignité humaine et du droit de ne pas contribuer à sa propre incrimination, au sens de la Loi fondamentale allemande.

2. Procédure et composition de la Cour

La requête a été introduite devant la Cour européenne des Droits de l’Homme le 30 janvier 2000 et déclarée en partie recevable le 26 octobre 2004.

Le 1er février 2005, la chambre à laquelle l’affaire avait été attribuée s’est dessaisie au profit de la Grande Chambre, en application de l’article 302 de la Convention. Une audience de Grande Chambre s’est déroulée en public dans le bâtiment des Droits de l’Homme, à Strasbourg, le 23 novembre 2005.

L’arrêt a été rendu par la Grande Chambre de 17 juges, composée en l’occurrence de :

Luzius Wildhaber (Suisse), président,
Christos Rozakis (Grec),
Nicolas Bratza (Britannique),
Boštjan M. Zupančič (Slovène),
Georg Ress (Allemand),
Giovanni Bonello (Maltais),
Lucius Caflisch (Suisse)3
Ireneu Cabral Barreto (Portugais),
Matti Pellonpää (Finlandais),
András Baka (Hongrois),
Rait Maruste (Estonien),
Snejana Botoucharova (Bulgare),
Javier Borrego Borrego (Espagnol),
Elisabet Fura-Sandström (Suédoise),
Alvina Gyulumyan (Arménienne),
Khanlar Hajiyev (Azerbaïdjanais),
Ján Šikuta (Slovaque), juges,

ainsi que de Lawrence Early, greffier de Section.

3. Résumé de l’arrêt4

Griefs

Le requérant se plaignait qu’un émétique lui fut administré de force et que les preuves obtenues – illégalement d’après lui – en conséquence ont été utilisées dans le cadre du procès pénal ayant abouti à sa condamnation. Il soutenait que son droit de ne pas contribuer à sa propre incrimination a été violé. Il invoquait les articles 3, 8 et 6 de la Convention.

Décision de la Cour

Article 3

La Cour rappelle que la Convention n’interdit pas, en principe, le recours à une intervention médicale de force susceptible de faire progresser l’enquête sur une infraction. Cependant, toute atteinte portée à l’intégrité physique d’une personne en vue de l’obtention d’éléments de preuve doit donner lieu à un examen rigoureux.

La Cour a une conscience aiguë des problèmes que rencontrent les Etats dans leur lutte pour protéger leurs sociétés des maux que provoque l’afflux de drogue. Toutefois, en l’espèce, il était clair avant que la mesure litigieuse n’ait été ordonnée et mise en œuvre que le trafiquant de rue auquel elle était appliquée conservait les stupéfiants dans la bouche et ne procédait donc pas à la vente en grandes quantités, comme en témoigne d’ailleurs la peine infligée. La Cour n’est pas convaincue que l’administration de force d’un émétique était indispensable en l’espèce pour obtenir les preuves ; les autorités de poursuite auraient pu simplement attendre l’élimination de la drogue par les voies naturelles, méthode que de nombreux autres Etats membres du Conseil de l’Europe appliquent pour enquêter en matière d’infractions à la législation sur les stupéfiants.

D’autre part, la Cour constate que les parties et les experts sont en désaccord sur le caractère dangereux ou non que représente l’administration d’un émétique. Elle n’est pas convaincue que cette méthode, qui a déjà entraîné la mort de deux personnes en Allemagne, ne comporte que des risques négligeables pour la santé. D’ailleurs, dans la plupart des Länder allemands et dans une grande majorité au moins des autres Etats membres du Conseil de l’Europe, les autorités s’abstiennent de recourir à l’administration de force d’un émétique, ce qui donne à penser que cette mesure est perçue comme comportant des risques pour la santé.

Quant à la façon dont l’émétique a été administré, la Cour constate qu’à l’aide d’une force proche de la brutalité, on a posé au requérant une sonde nasogastrique pour vaincre sa résistance physique et mentale, ce qui a dû être douloureux et angoissant pour lui. Il a ensuite subi un acte d’intrusion physique supplémentaire contre sa volonté puisqu’on lui a injecté un autre émétique. Il y a lieu de tenir compte également de la souffrance mentale qu’il a endurée en attendant que la substance produisît ses effets, tout en étant immobilisé et maintenu sous surveillance. Il a dû être humiliant pour lui d’être forcé de régurgiter dans ces conditions, en tout cas bien plus qu’en cas l’élimination des stupéfiants par les voies naturelles.

En ce qui concerne la supervision médicale, la Cour note que la mesure litigieuse a été mise en œuvre par un médecin dans un hôpital. Cependant, étant donné que le requérant a opposé une résistance vigoureuse, qu’il ne parlait pas l’allemand et s’exprimait uniquement dans un mauvais anglais, il y a lieu de supposer qu’il ne pouvait ou ne voulait pas répondre aux questions du médecin ou se soumettre à un examen médical.

Quant aux effets de la mesure litigieuse sur la santé du suspect, la Cour n’estime pas établi que ce soit l’administration de force de l’émétique qui ait nécessité le traitement que l’intéressé a suivi pour ses troubles gastriques à l’hôpital de la prison deux mois et demi après son arrestation, ou tout traitement médical ultérieur.

Pour conclure, la Cour estime que les autorités allemandes ont porté gravement atteinte à l’intégrité physique et mentale du requérant, contre son gré. Elles l’ont forcé à vomir, non pas pour des raisons thérapeutiques mais pour recueillir des éléments de preuve qu’elles auraient également pu obtenir par des méthodes moins intrusives. La façon dont la mesure litigieuse a été exécutée était de nature à inspirer au requérant des sentiments de peur, d’angoisse et d’infériorité propres à l’humilier et à l’avilir. En outre, elle a comporté des risques pour sa santé, en particulier en raison du manquement à procéder préalablement à une anamnèse adéquate. Bien que ce ne fût pas délibéré, la façon dont l’intervention a été pratiquée a également occasionné au requérant des douleurs physiques et des souffrances mentales. L’intéressé a donc été soumis à un traitement inhumain et dégradant contraire à l’article 3.

Article 8

La Cour a déjà examiné sous l’angle de l’article 3 de la Convention le grief du requérant concernant l’administration de force d’un émétique. Eu égard à son constat de violation de l’article 3, la Cour estime qu’aucune question distincte ne se pose au regard de l’article 8 de la Convention.

Article 6

La Cour rappelle que, même si les autorités n’ont pas infligé délibérément des douleurs et souffrances au requérant, les éléments de preuve ont été obtenus par la mise en œuvre d’une mesure contraire à l’un des droits les plus fondamentaux garantis par la Convention. En outre, les stupéfiants ainsi recueillis ont été l’élément décisif de la condamnation du requérant. Enfin, l’intérêt public à la condamnation du requérant ne saurait justifier que l’on autorisât l’utilisation de ces éléments au procès. Dès lors, l’utilisation comme preuve des stupéfiants recueillis grâce à l’administration de force de l’émétique au requérant a frappé d’iniquité l’ensemble du procès de celui-ci.

En dépit de cette conclusion, la Cour estime toutefois devoir répondre à l’argument du requérant selon lequel la manière dont les preuves ont été obtenues et l’utilisation qui en a été faite ont porté atteinte à son droit de ne pas contribuer à sa propre incrimination.

Concernant la nature et le degré de la coercition employée pour la collecte des éléments de preuve, la Cour rappelle avoir jugé que l’administration de l’émétique constitue un traitement inhumain et dégradant. Elle estime que l’intérêt public à la condamnation du requérant ne pouvait justifier de recourir à une atteinte aussi grave à l’intégrité physique et mentale de celui-ci. Par ailleurs, même si le droit allemand fournissait des garanties contre une application arbitraire ou indue de la mesure, le requérant, invoquant son droit de garder le silence, a refusé de se soumettre à un examen médical préalable et on a pratiqué l’intervention sur lui sans véritablement examiner son aptitude physique à la supporter. Enfin, les drogues ainsi recueillies ont été vraiment déterminantes pour sa condamnation.

Par conséquent, la Cour aurait été amenée à conclure également que le fait d’avoir permis l’utilisation au procès du requérant des éléments obtenus à la suite de l’administration de force de l’émétique a porté atteinte au droit de l’intéressé de ne pas contribuer à sa propre incrimination et a donc entaché d’iniquité la procédure dans son ensemble.

Les juges Bratza et Zupančič ont chacun exprimé une opinion concordante ; les juges Wildhaber et Caflisch ont exprimé une opinion dissidente commune ; les juges Ress, Pellonpää, Baka et Sikuta ont exprimé une opinion dissidente commune ; et le juge Hajiyev a exprimé une opinion dissidente. Le texte de ces opinions se trouve joint à l’arrêt.

Les arrêts de la Cour sont disponibles sur son site Internet (http://www.echr.coe.int).

Contacts pour la presse
Emma Hellyer (téléphone : 00 33 (0)3 90 21 42 15)
Stéphanie Klein (téléphone : 00 33 (0)3 88 41 21 54)
Beverley Jacobs (téléphone : 00 33 (0)3 90 21 54 21)

La Cour européenne des Droits de l’Homme a été créée à Strasbourg par les États membres du Conseil de l’Europe en 1959 pour connaître des allégations de violation de la Convention européenne des Droits de l’Homme de 1950.

Division de la Presse du Conseil de l’Europe
Tel: +33 (0)3 88 41 25 60
Fax:+33 (0)3 88 41 39 11
pressunit@coe.int
www.coe.int/press

1 Les arrêts de Grande Chambre sont définitifs (article 44 de la Convention). 2 . Si l’affaire pendante devant une chambre soulève une question grave relative à l’interprétation de la Convention ou de ses Protocoles, ou si la solution d’une question peut conduire à une contradiction avec un arrêt rendu antérieurement par la Cour, la chambre peut, tant qu’elle n’a pas rendu son arrêt, se dessaisir au profit de la Grande Chambre, à moins que l’une des parties ne s’y oppose. 3 Juge élu au titre du Liechtenstein. 4 Rédigé par le greffe, ce résumé ne lie pas la Cour.

--
Press release – 406(2006)
06.07.2006

EUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTS

Press release issued by the Registrar

FORTHCOMING GRAND CHAMBER JUDGMENT
JALLOH v. GERMANY

11 July 2006

The European Court of Human Rights will be holding a public hearing in the Human Rights Building, Strasbourg, on Tuesday 11 July 2006 at 2.30 p.m. (local time) to deliver the Grand Chamber judgment in the case of Jalloh v. Germany (application no. 54810/00).
The press release and the text of the judgment will be available after the hearing on the Court’s Internet site (http://www.echr.coe.int).

Jalloh v. Germany

The case concerns an application brought by Abu Bakah Jalloh, a national of Sierra Leone, who was born in 1965 and lives in Cologne (Germany).

On 29 October 1993, plain-clothes policemen spotted the applicant taking two small bags out of his mouth and handing them over for money. Considering that the bags contained drugs, the police officers went over to arrest the applicant.

While they were doing so he swallowed another small bag that he still had in his mouth. As no drugs were found on him, the competent public prosecutor ordered that he be given an emetic (Brechmittel) to force him to regurgitate the bag.

The applicant was taken to a hospital in Wuppertal-Elberfeld, where the police officers held him down while a doctor put a tube up his nose and administered a salt solution and Ipecacuanha syrup by force. The doctor also injected him with apomorphine, a derivative of morphine. As a result the applicant regurgitated a small bag of 0.2182 g of cocaine.

On 30 October 1993 the applicant was placed in detention on remand until 23 March 1994. He was tried before Wuppertal District Court, which convicted him of drug trafficking and gave him a one-year suspended prison sentence.

The applicant’s lawyer had submitted that the evidence against Mr Jalloh had been obtained illegally and so could not be used in the criminal proceedings. He maintained that the police officers and the doctor who had participated in the operation were guilty of having caused bodily harm in the exercise of official duties (Körperverletzung im Amt). The administration of toxic substances was prohibited by Section 136a of the Code of Criminal Procedure (Strafprozeßordnung) and the measure was also disproportionate under Section 81a of the Code of Criminal Procedure, as it would have been possible to obtain the same result by waiting until the bag had been excreted naturally.

The applicant appealed unsuccessfully, although his prison sentence was reduced to six-months, suspended. His further appeal was dismissed.

The Federal Constitutional Court refused to admit the applicant’s constitutional complaint, finding that he had not made use of all available remedies before the German criminal courts. The court also found that the measure in question did not give rise to any constitutional objections concerning the protection of human dignity or prevention of self-incrimination, as guaranteed under German Basic Law.

The applicant complains that an emetic was administered to him by force and about the use of evidence thus obtained – in his view illegally – in the criminal proceedings leading to his conviction. He claims that his right not to incriminate himself was violated. He relies on Article 3 (prohibition of inhuman and degrading treatment), Article 6 (right to a fair trial) and Article 8 (right to respect for private life) of the European Convention on Human Rights.

The application was lodged before the European Court of Human Rights on 30 January 2000 and declared partly admissible on 26 October 2004.

On 1 February 2005, the Chamber to which the case had been allocated, relinquished jurisdiction in favour of the Grand Chamber, under Article 301 of the Convention. A Grand Chamber hearing took place in the Human Rights building, Strasbourg on 23 November 2005.

***

Press Contacts
Emma Hellyer (telephone: 00 33 (0)3 90 21 42 15)
Stéphanie Klein (telephone: 00 33 (0)3 88 41 21 54)
Beverley Jacobs (telephone: 00 33 (0)3 90 21 54 21)

The European Court of Human Rights was set up in Strasbourg by the Council of Europe Member States in 1959 to deal with alleged violations of the 1950 European Convention on Human Rights.

1 Where a case pending before a Chamber raises a serious question affecting the interpretation of the Convention or the protocols thereto, or where the resolution of a question before the Chamber might have a result inconsistent with a judgment previously delivered by the Court, the Chamber may, at any time before it has rendered its judgment, relinquish jurisdiction in favour of the Grand Chamber, unless one of the parties to the case objects.
Top
++++
french:

Communiqué de presse - 406(2006)
06.07.2006

COUR EUROPÉENNE DES DROITS DE L’HOMME

Communiqué du Greffier

ANNONCE ARRÊT DE GRANDE CHAMBRE
JALLOH c. ALLEMAGNE

Le 11 juillet 2006

La Cour européenne des Droits de l’Homme tiendra le mardi 11 juillet 2006 à 14 h 30 (heure locale) au Palais des Droits de l’Homme à Strasbourg une audience publique pour rendre son arrêt de Grande Chambre dans l’affaire Jalloh c. Allemagne (requête no 54810/00).

Le communiqué et le texte de l’arrêt seront disponibles immédiatement après l’audience sur le site Internet de la Cour (http://www.echr.coe.int).

Jalloh c. Allemagne

L’affaire concerne une requête introduite par Abu Bakah Jalloh, un ressortissant sierra-léonais né en 1965 et domicilié à Cologne (Allemagne).
Le 29 octobre 1993, des policiers en civil le virent retirer deux petits sachets de sa bouche et les échanger contre de l’argent. Soupçonnant que les sachets contenaient de la drogue, les policiers procédèrent à l’arrestation de l’intéressé.

Alors qu’ils étaient en train de l’appréhender, le requérant avala un autre petit sachet qu’il avait toujours dans sa bouche. Les policiers n’ayant pas trouvé de drogue sur lui, le procureur compétent ordonna qu’on lui administrât un émétique (Brechmittel) pour le forcer à régurgiter le sachet.

Le requérant fut emmené dans un hôpital de Wuppertal-Elberfeld, où les policiers l’immobilisèrent pendant qu’un médecin lui faisait passer un tube dans le nez et lui administrait de force une solution salée et du sirop d’Ipecacuanha. Le médecin injecta également à l’intéressé de l'apomorphine, substance dérivée de la morphine. Le requérant régurgita alors un petit sachet de 0,2182 grammes de cocaïne.

Le 30 octobre 1993, il fut placé en détention provisoire, où il demeura jusqu’au 23 mars 1994. Il fut jugé par le tribunal de district de Wuppertal, qui le reconnut coupable de trafic de stupéfiants et lui infligea une peine d’un an d’emprisonnement avec sursis.

L’avocat de l’intéressé avait articulé la défense de son client autour de trois arguments principaux : premièrement, les preuves à charge avaient été obtenues de manière illégale et ne pouvaient donc être utilisées dans le cadre du procès ; deuxièmement, les policiers et le médecin qui avaient participé à l’opération s’étaient rendus coupables de coups et blessures dans l’exercice de leurs fonctions (Körperverletzung im Amt) ; troisièmement, l’administration de substances

toxiques était prohibée par l’article 136 a) du code de procédure pénale (Strafprozeßordnung), et la mesure était également disproportionnée au sens de l’article 81 a) du même code, dès lors qu’il eût été possible de parvenir au même résultat en attendant l’excrétion naturelle du sachet.

Le requérant interjeta vainement appel de la décision, même si sa peine fut réduite à six mois d’emprisonnement avec sursis. Un nouveau recours formé par lui fut également rejeté.

La Cour constitutionnelle fédérale refusa de connaître de la plainte constitutionnelle de l’intéressé, estimant que celui-ci n’avait pas épuisé les voies de recours disponibles devant les juridictions pénales allemandes. Elle jugea également que la mesure litigieuse ne justifiait pas la formulation d’objections constitutionnelles concernant la protection de la dignité humaine et du droit de ne pas contribuer à sa propre incrimination, au sens de la Loi fondamentale allemande.

Le requérant se plaint qu’un émétique lui fut administré de force et que les preuves obtenues – illégalement d’après lui – en conséquence ont été utilisées dans le cadre du procès pénal ayant abouti à sa condamnation. Il soutient que son droit de ne pas contribuer à sa propre incrimination a été violé. Il invoque les articles 3 (interdiction des traitements inhumains ou dégradants), 6 (droit à un procès équitable) et 8 (droit au respect de la vie privée) de la Convention européenne des Droits de l’Homme.

La requête a été introduite devant la Cour européenne des Droits de l’Homme le 30 janvier 2000 et déclarée en partie recevable le 26 octobre 2004.

Le 1er février 2005, la chambre à laquelle l’affaire avait été attribuée s’est dessaisie au profit de la Grande Chambre, en application de l’article 301 de la Convention. Une audience de Grande Chambre a eu lieu au Palais des Droits de l’Homme, à Strasbourg, le 23 novembre 2005.
***
Contacts pour la presse
Emma Hellyer (téléphone : 00 33 (0)3 90 21 42 15)
Stéphanie Klein (téléphone : 00 33 (0)3 88 41 21 54)
Beverley Jacobs (téléphone : 00 33 (0)3 90 21 54 21)

La Cour européenne des Droits de l’Homme a été créée à Strasbourg par les États membres du Conseil de l’Europe en 1959 pour connaître des allégations de violation de la Convention européenne des Droits de l’Homme de 1950.

1 . Si l’affaire pendante devant une chambre soulève une question grave relative à l’interprétation de la Convention ou de ses Protocoles, ou si la solution d’une question peut conduire à une contradiction avec un arrêt rendu antérieurement par la Cour, la chambre peut, tant qu’elle n’a pas rendu son arrêt, se dessaisir au profit de la Grande Chambre, à moins que l’une des parties ne s’y oppose.
Haut de page

Press Release - 633(2005)

The European Court of Human Rights - Grand Chamber Hearing - Jalloh v. Germany

The European Court of Human Rights is holding a Grand Chamber hearing today 23 November 2005 at 9 a.m. in the case of Jalloh v. Germany (application no. 54810/00).

The applicant

The case concerns an application brought by Abu Bakah Jalloh, a national of Sierra Leone, who was born in 1965 and lives in Cologne (Germany).

Summary of the facts

On 29 October 1993, plain-clothes policemen spotted the applicant taking two small bags out of his mouth and handing them over for money. Considering that the bags contained drugs, the police officers went over to arrest the applicant.

While they were doing so he swallowed another small bag that he still had in his mouth. As no drugs were found on him, the competent public prosecutor ordered that he be given an emetic (Brechmittel) to force him to regurgitate the bag.

The applicant was taken to a hospital in Wuppertal-Elberfeld, where the police officers held him down while a doctor put a tube up his nose and administered a salt solution and Ipecacuanha syrup by force. The doctor also injected him with apomorphine, a derivative of morphine. As a result the applicant regurgitated a small bag of 0.2182 g of cocaine.

On 30 October 1993 the applicant was placed in detention on remand until 23 March 1994. He was tried before Wuppertal District Court, which convicted him of drug trafficking and gave him a one-year suspended prison sentence.

The applicant’s lawyer had submitted that the evidence against Mr Jalloh had been obtained illegally and so could not be used in the criminal proceedings. He maintained that the police officers and the doctor who had participated in the operation were guilty of having caused bodily harm in the exercise of official duties (Körperverletzung im Amt). The administration of toxic substances was prohibited by Section 136a of the Code of Criminal Procedure (Strafprozeßordnung) and the measure was also disproportionate under Section 81a of the Code of Criminal Procedure, as it would have been possible to obtain the same result by waiting until the bag had been excreted naturally.

The applicant appealed unsuccessfully, although his prison sentence was reduced to six-months, suspended. His further appeal was dismissed.

The Federal Constitutional Court refused to admit the applicant’s constitutional complaint, finding that he had not made use of all available remedies before the German criminal courts. The court also found that the measure in question did not give rise to any constitutional objections concerning the protection of human dignity or prevention of self-incrimination, as guaranteed under German Basic Law.

Complaints

The applicant complains that an emetic was administered to him by force and about the use of evidence thus obtained – in his view illegally – in the criminal proceedings leading to his conviction. He claims that his right not to incriminate himself was violated. He relies on Article 3 (prohibition of inhuman and degrading treatment), Article 6 (right to a fair trial) and Article 8 (right to respect for private life) of the European Convention on Human Rights.

Procedure

The application was lodged before the European Court of Human Rights on 30 January 2000 and declared partly admissible on 26 October 2004. On 1 February 2005, the Chamber to which the case had been allocated, relinquished jurisdiction in favour of the Grand Chamber, under Article 301 of the Convention.

Composition of the Court
The case will be heard by the Grand Chamber composed as follows:
Luzius Wildhaber (Swiss), President,
Christos Rozakis (Greek),
Nicolas Bratza (British),
Boštjan M. Zupančič (Slovenian),
Georg Ress (German),
Giovanni Bonello (Maltese),
Lucius Caflisch2 (Swiss)
Ireneu Cabral Barreto (Portuguese),
Matti Pellonpää (Finnish),
András Baka (Hungarian),
Rait Maruste (Estonian),
Javier Borrego Borrego (Spanish),
Elisabet Fura-Sandström (Swedish),
Khanlar Hajiyev (Azerbaijani),
Ljiljana Mijović (citizen of Bosnia and Herzegovina),
Alvina Gyulumyan (Armenian),
Ján Šikuta (Slovakian), judges,
Snejana Botoucharova (Bulgarian),
Egbert Myjer (Netherlands),
Loukis Loucaides (Cypriot), substitute judges,
and also Lawrence Early, Deputy Grand Chamber Registrar.

Representatives of the parties

Government:
Almut Wittling-Vogel, Agent,
Heiko Brückner, Christina Kreis, Jakob Klaas, Klaus Püschel,
Harald Körner, Advisers;

Applicant:
Ulrich Busch, Andrej Busch, Counsel.

After the hearing the Court will begin its deliberations, which are held in private.

Registry of the European Court of Human Rights
F – 67075 Strasbourg Cedex

Press contacts:
Roderick Liddell (telephone: +00 33 (0)3 88 41 24 92)
Emma Hellyer (telephone: +00 33 (0)3 90 21 42 15)
Stéphanie Klein (telephone: +00 33 (0)3 88 41 21 54)
Beverley Jacobs (telephone: +00 33 (0)3 90 21 54 21)
Fax: +00 33 (0)3 88 41 27 91

The European Court of Human Rights was set up in Strasbourg by the Council of Europe Member States in 1959 to deal with alleged violations of the 1950 European Convention on Human Rights. Since 1 November 1998 it has sat as a full-time Court composed of an equal number of judges to that of the States party to the Convention. The Court examines the admissibility and merits of applications submitted to it. It sits in Chambers of 7 judges or, in exceptional cases, as a Grand Chamber of 17 judges. The Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe supervises the execution of the Court’s judgments. More detailed information about the Court and its activities can be found on its Internet site.

1. Where a case pending before a Chamber raises a serious question affecting the interpretation of the Convention or the protocols thereto, or where the resolution of a question before the Chamber might have a result inconsistent with a judgment previously delivered by the Court, the Chamber may, at any time before it has rendered its judgment, relinquish jurisdiction in favour of the Grand Chamber, unless one of the parties to the case objects.

2. Judge elected in respect of Liechtenstein.

++++++#

French:

Communiqué de presse - 633(2005)

La Cour européenne des Droits de l’Homme - Audience de Grande Chambre - Jalloh c. Allemagne

La Cour européenne des Droits de l’Homme tient ce mercredi 23 novembre 2005 à 9 heures une audience de Grande Chambre dans l’affaire Jalloh c. Allemagne (requête no 54810/00).

Le requérant

L’affaire concerne une requête introduite par Abu Bakah Jalloh, un ressortissant sierra-léonais né en 1965 et domicilié à Cologne (Allemagne).

Résumé des faits

Le 29 octobre 1993, des policiers en civil le virent retirer deux petits sachets de sa bouche et les échanger contre de l’argent. Soupçonnant que les sachets contenaient de la drogue, les policiers procédèrent à l’arrestation de l’intéressé.

Alors qu’ils étaient en train de l’appréhender, le requérant avala un autre petit sachet qu’il avait toujours dans sa bouche. Les policiers n’ayant pas trouvé de drogue sur lui, le procureur compétent ordonna qu’on lui administrât un émétique (Brechmittel) pour le forcer à régurgiter le sachet.

Le requérant fut emmené dans un hôpital de Wuppertal-Elberfeld, où les policiers l’immobilisèrent pendant qu’un médecin lui faisait passer un tube dans le nez et lui administrait de force une solution salée et du sirop d’Ipecacuanha. Le médecin injecta également à l’intéressé de l'apomorphine, substance dérivée de la morphine. Le requérant régurgita alors un petit sachet de 0,2182 grammes de cocaïne.

Le 30 octobre 1993, il fut placé en détention provisoire, où il demeura jusqu’au 23 mars 1994. Il fut jugé par le tribunal de district de Wuppertal, qui le reconnut coupable de trafic de stupéfiants et lui infligea une peine d’un an d’emprisonnement avec sursis.

L’avocat de l’intéressé avait articulé la défense de son client autour de trois arguments principaux : premièrement, les preuves à charge avaient été obtenues de manière illégale et ne pouvaient donc être utilisées dans le cadre du procès ; deuxièmement, les policiers et le médecin qui avaient participé à l’opération s’étaient rendus coupables de coups et blessures dans l’exercice de leurs fonctions (Körperverletzung im Amt) ; troisièmement, l’administration de substances toxiques était prohibée par l’article 136 a) du code de procédure pénale (Strafprozeßordnung), et la mesure était également disproportionnée au sens de l’article 81 a) du même code, dès lors qu’il eût été possible de parvenir au même résultat en attendant l’excrétion naturelle du sachet.

Le requérant interjeta vainement appel de la décision, même si sa peine fut réduite à six mois d’emprisonnement avec sursis. Un nouveau recours formé par lui fut également rejeté.

La Cour constitutionnelle fédérale refusa de connaître de la plainte constitutionnelle de l’intéressé, estimant que celui-ci n’avait pas épuisé les voies de recours disponibles devant les juridictions pénales allemandes. Elle jugea également que la mesure litigieuse ne justifiait pas la formulation d’objections constitutionnelles concernant la protection de la dignité humaine et du droit de ne pas contribuer à sa propre incrimination, au sens de la Loi fondamentale allemande.

Griefs

Le requérant se plaint qu’un émétique lui fut administré de force et que les preuves obtenues – illégalement d’après lui – en conséquence ont été utilisées dans le cadre du procès pénal ayant abouti à sa condamnation. Il soutient que son droit de ne pas contribuer à sa propre incrimination a été violé. Il invoque les articles 3 (interdiction des traitements inhumains ou dégradants), 6 (droit à un procès équitable) et 8 (droit au respect de la vie privée) de la Convention européenne des Droits de l’Homme.

Procédure

La requête a été introduite devant la Cour européenne des Droits de l’Homme le 30 janvier 2000 et déclarée en partie recevable le 26 octobre 2004. Le 1er février 2005, la chambre à laquelle l’affaire avait été attribuée s’est dessaisie au profit de la Grande Chambre, en application de l’article 301 de la Convention.

Composition de la Cour

L’affaire sera examinée par la Grande Chambre, qui siégera dans la composition suivante :
Luzius Wildhaber (Suisse), président,
Christos Rozakis (Grec),
Nicolas Bratza (Britannique),
Boštjan M. Zupančič (Slovène),
Georg Ress (Allemand),
Giovanni Bonello (Maltais),
Lucius Caflisch2 (Suisse) ,
Ireneu Cabral Barreto (Portugais),
Matti Pellonpää (Finlandais),
András Baka (Hongrois),
Rait Maruste (Estonien),
Javier Borrego Borrego (Espagnol),
Elisabet Fura-Sandström (Suédoise),
Khanlar Hajiyev (Azerbaïdjanais),
Ljiljana Mijović (ressortissante de la Bosnie-Herzégovine),
Alvina Gyulumyan (Arménienne),
Ján Šikuta (Slovaque), juges,
Snejana Botoucharova (Bulgare),
Egbert Myjer (Néerlandais),
Loukis Loucaides (Cypriote), juges suppléants,
ainsi que Lawrence Early, greffier adjoint de la Grande Chambre.

Représentants des parties

Gouvernement :
Almut Wittling-Vogel, agent,
Heiko Brückner, Christina Kreis, Jakob Klaas, Klaus Püschel,
Harald Körner, conseillers ;

Requérant :
Ulrich Busch, Andrej Busch, conseils.

Après les débats commenceront les délibérations de la Cour, qui se tiendront en chambre du conseil.

Greffe de la Cour européenne des Droits de l’Homme
F – 67075 Strasbourg Cedex

Contacts pour la presse :
Roderick Liddell (téléphone : +00 33 (0)3 88 41 24 92)
Emma Hellyer (téléphone : +00 33 (0)3 90 21 42 15)
Stéphanie Klein (téléphone : +00 33 (0)3 88 41 21 54)
Beverley Jacobs (téléphone : +00 33 (0)3 90 21 54 21)
Télécopieur : +00 33 (0)3 88 41 27 91

La Cour européenne des Droits de l’Homme a été créée à Strasbourg par les Etats membres du Conseil de l’Europe en 1959 pour connaître des allégations de violation de la Convention européenne des Droits de l’Homme de 1950. Elle se compose d’un nombre de juges égal à celui des Etats parties à la Convention. Siégeant à temps plein depuis le 1er novembre 1998, elle examine en chambres de 7 juges ou, exceptionnellement, en une Grande Chambre de 17 juges, la recevabilité et le fond des requêtes qui lui sont soumises. L’exécution de ses arrêts est surveillée par le Comité des Ministres du Conseil de l’Europe. La Cour fournit sur son site Internet des informations plus détaillées concernant son organisation et son activité.

1. Si l’affaire pendante devant une chambre soulève une question grave relative à l’interprétation de la Convention ou de ses Protocoles, ou si la solution d’une question peut conduire à une contradiction avec un arrêt rendu antérieurement par la Cour, la chambre peut, tant qu’elle n’a pas rendu son arrêt, se dessaisir au profit de la Grande Chambre, à moins que l’une des parties ne s’y oppose.
2. Juge élu au titre du Liechtenstein.

Languages: